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Traditional In-Home Respite

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Traditional in-home respite is appropriate for individuals of all ages and is available in situations when the parent or primary caregiver has a need for temporary relief or assistance with caregiver responsibilities.

Our traditional in-home respite services fall into three categories:

Respite: A support service designed to provide parents and other primary caregivers with temporary relief from the constant care required by a family member with special needs.

Daycare: Provides care to an individual while the parents or other primary caregivers are working or attending an educational program.

Attendant Care: Provides an extra set of hands to individuals who need support completing their activities of daily living.

Traditional in-home respite services must be provided inside of the family’s home and can only be provided for the individual authorized for care. Sessions can be as short in duration as 2 hours, or respite support may be provided 24/7 depending on the needs of the individual. Prior to initiating care, a supervisor conducts an initial appointment to understand the needs of the specific individual and family and identifies respite providers who are a good match.

Our traditional in-home respite services are provided by a team of professionals who are experienced and passionate about working with individuals of all ages who have developmental disabilities. Our trained and responsible staff are actively engaged with the individual receiving care while participating in preferred activities in the family home. All our care providers have passed a live scan clearance as validated by DOJ and FBI and maintain current CPR and First Aid certification. Additionally, all staff are certified in Non-Violent Crisis Prevention and Intervention (NCPI).

When providing respite care, we often rotate staff members in the home. This is especially helpful when working with children as it helps them grow accustomed to meeting a variety of people. This makes it easier for them to transition into outside programs for more training, and eventually help them prepare to live as independently as possible.

Who Pays for Respite Services?

In the state of California, the local Regional Center will authorize and pay for appropriate and necessary services for any individual assessed and diagnosed with a developmental disability. The state defines developmental disability as “intellectual disability, autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and other conditions similar to intellectual disability that require treatment similar to a person with intellectual disability.”

The state will pay for services for individuals at any income level as long as the need for services is demonstrated. The number of hours is dependent on each particular case or need but is typically 30 hours per month.

Parents and other primary caregivers can also receive respite services under a self-pay arrangement, paying for services directly as needed.

Other Options

Some individuals cannot be supported by traditional in-home respite services if their behavioral needs require more intensive support than the traditional in-home respite services can provide. For individuals requiring more intensive support, we offer Specialized Personal Assistance services.

Services Provided By:

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